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Monday, December 1, 2014

It's hard to find sense in all this change

"RMISO" DZZMDKO NI NICU NIM EMINTLIDSLNI NW DTMKLRDI RNLI RYKKMISCU WNYIE LI RLKRYCDSLNI!

5 comments:

Cryptopop said...

Very true, although the word,"rmis"
can be found on the penny.

jdege said...

I seem to remember Alistair Cooke remarking on how humorous the Brits found our use of the nickname "dime" for our ten-cent piece.

The thing is, it isn't a nickname. It's actually called a "dime". Jefferson's idea was for a decimal currency, with four denominations, the cent, the dime, the dollar, and the eagle.

The only nicknames in common usage for US coinage are the penny and the nickle.

Cryptopop said...

Speaking of the dime (or "disme"), it is interesting to note that the "mercury" dime is, in fact. a misnomer. It is actually a "liberty head" dime but because it is winged, it was incorrectly thought to resemble the god, Mercury.

BreakingCodes said...

jdege, I always thought the Brits had funny names for their money!

Cryptopop, the image on the so-called Mercury dime was one of my favorites, back in my coin-collecting days. It symbolizes "Liberty of Thought."

Mark said...

Speaking of Liberty dimes... isn't it curious that the reverse of the coin has a representation of a fasces (Roman symbol of power and jurisdiction) while the obverse has a depiction of (not Mercury) but the goddess Liberty. I would have thought that the coin which spanned two World Wars would have at least found an American patriot to put on it. It is beautiful though...